Tag Archives: assessment

T&L journal Issue 1 2015-6

This term’s festive inspired T&L journal is out now!

As part of our drive for quality verbal responses, Faculty Leader of Humanities Anton Kolaric has been developing the use of hinge questions. As a result of our recent ‘Bright Spots’ learning walk you can also see examples of the great teaching at Aldridge School. Inspired by Lesson Study, Faculty Leader of Mathematics Graham Wilson has established Learning PODs this term.  Every teacher has been paired up with two colleagues, and are working on a key factor associated with great teaching.  The findings will be shared duirng our whole school Tea-time Tasters next half term. Matthew Moore has also written a detailed review of ‘Making Every Lesson Count‘ and its application in the classroom.

expert pub

Hard copies as usual will go out to all staff but you can find a copy using the link below:

Issue 1 2015-6

Student post – Taking student independence to the next level

leadershipThis was a fantastic English lesson that I had the privilege to watch as part of our Open Classroom week. 3 students have written the post below about their preparations in leading an English lesson and their review of how it went…..

Starter Activity:

We wanted to see the pupils’ understanding of the character of TJ before we started the lesson. It gave us a good understanding of their knowledge already and what they needed to do for their assessment. It showed us that the class knew a lot of basic knowledge but not in enough depth.

Main Activities:

We needed to differentiate the tasks based on the table groups as miss seats us on different tables based on our target grades. As a three, we came up with a list of suitable activities and then gave each one to the group we thought it was best suited to and who would complete the task to a high standard.  Each task had to be challenging. We also had to consider the number of people in each group and pupils’ stronger/weaker areas. For example, we knew that one student was talented in drama and when we looked at the number of people in his group, it fitted the drama task we had previously come up with.

Plenary:

The main task was factual and was based on the story whereas the plenary was more of their own interpretation and allowed them to be more open minded. This is important because in the assessment everyone needs to put in their own individual opinion in order to make their work unique. Furthermore, the plenary focused on TJ’s feelings and emotions which had not been explored in detail in the previous task. By the end of the lesson, we could see that the class had improved their knowledge of TJ that they had at the start of the lesson.

Homework:

Knowing that in a future lesson we had an assessment on the character TJ, we createStudent independenced a task to develop their understanding and help them achieve a higher grade in their assessment. When we came up with the diary entry idea we realised this was good task for the class to learn more about TJ’s mannerisms. Whilst setting the task, we asked the class whether they understood the success criteria and we went through this with them, so when at home they could complete it to a high standard and had no excuses.

Our Opinion On Teaching:

We all enjoy leading the lesson because it enables us to retain the information. Furthermore, it helps us to understand and appreciate what teachers do and the time it takes. It also enables us to work with new people and in groups and show our full potential.

Many thanks to Caitlin Carter, Natasha Smith and Ruby Worral for taking the time to write this and also Nichola Heeley, their dedicated English teacher.